Source: http://gizmodo.com/5849026/hp-and-conde-nast-are-creating-an-unholy-union-to-print-magazines-on-your-home-printer-so-you-can-not-read-them-and-waste-paper-and-buy-more-expensive-ink

HP Wants You to Print Magazines with Your Home Printer So You Can Waste More Paper and Buy More InkTwo wrongs don’t make a right. I think I learned that as a 4-year-old. Apparently, HP and Condé Nast skipped out on that life lesson because they’re combining two dying things—print media and printers—to create the unholiest of unions: your HP printer at home will print out Condé Nast magazines for you to read.

It sounds straight out of the webpages of the Onion but it’s true, Condé Nast magazines like Wired, Details, Epicurious, Glamour, Allure, Golf Digest etc. will be “delivered” to people’s personal HP web printers so that they can presumably read them without having to go to the magazine stand. This is real! You schedule when you want to read the mags and your HP printer starts spitting out the pages. (I’m assuming you have to staple the pages together yourself)

I guess this could work in a bizarro world where there is no such thing as tablets or laptops or computers or smartphones or the Internet or common sense but we’re not living in that world! Instead, we live in an era where people are ditching their printers cause they’re useless, people who have printers never print anything because printer ink is ass expensive and print media is dying (which is legitimately sad). But still, combining print and more print is the dumbest thing HP’s done this… month, I guess.

But HP is serious about this. And since they want to revive the printer as some sort of news hub, they’re offering a subscription service for printer ink delivery. It’s like Netflix but for printer ink! Subscriptions for HP Instant Ink will start from $5.99 to $10.99 per month depending on the product line (shipping included). This will not end well. [HP, Image Credit: photographer2222/Shutterstock]


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Source: http://lifehacker.com/5814945/everyone-wants-better-no-one-wants-change

"Everyone Wants Better. No One Wants Change"Jonathan Fields points out that often times we’re only interested in the result and want to ignore the hard work it takes to get it. The internet has created a culture based on immediacy, and that is good in many ways, but sometimes the hard way is better. Being healthy and happy isn’t just a decision to make. It takes concentrated, ongoing effort. It’s easy to see the hard stuff as bad, but it rarely is. Even positive change may be stressful, but it’s going to be better.

Photo by Yuri Arcurs

"Everyone Wants Better. No One Wants Change" Everyone Wants Better. No One Wants Change | Jonathan Fields


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