Source: http://gizmodo.com/5842331/android-grows-but-apple-still-dominates-airport-wifi-networks/gallery/1

Android Grows, but Apple Still Dominates Airport Wi-Fi Networks If you’re in an airport and using the public Wi-Fi, chances are you are reading this post on your smartphone or tablet. And for 83 percent of you, this mobile device is either an iPhone, iPad or iPod touch.

According to data compiled by Boingo Wireless, the company behind 60 airport hotspots and over 400,000 public hotspots worldwide, a dwindling number of users (41 percent) pull out their laptop at public hotspots, while most (59 percent) use a smartphone or a tablet.

This is a complete 180 from 2008 when the majority of people (88.5 percent) were rocking laptops and a small minority (11 percent) were cruising the internet using a mobile device.

And it’s iOS that rules the mobile roost on Boingo’s wireless network. Yes, the data shows that Android devices have tripled in number over the last year, but its 11 percent share pales in comparison to the 83 percent commanded by the iPhone, iPad and iPod touch.

So what are people doing with their mobile devices on these public Wi-Fi hotspots? Boingo thinks most people are streaming music and video because data usage by mobile devices is skyrocketing. In 2011, users are pulling down 0.89MB of data per minute, up from a measly 0.37 MB in 2009. A little less than a megabyte per minute is not a lot, but it may be enough to secretly watch Rebecca Black on your iPhone while you wait for your plane. [Boingo Wireless]

Android Grows, but Apple Still Dominates Airport Wi-Fi Networks
Android Grows, but Apple Still Dominates Airport Wi-Fi Networks
Android Grows, but Apple Still Dominates Airport Wi-Fi Networks
Android Grows, but Apple Still Dominates Airport Wi-Fi Networks
Android Grows, but Apple Still Dominates Airport Wi-Fi Networks


drag2share – drag and drop RSS news items on your email contacts to share (click SEE DEMO)

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Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/facebook-news-feed-apps-2011-7

Facebook users spend most of their time in the News Feed, the river of information about your friends, and comparatively very little (just 10%) using apps according to a comScore report on how people use Facebook. 

This is interesting because the biggest app company, Zynga, filed to go public, and more generally because tons of Facebook apps are getting zillions of VC money all the time.

If people spend so little time on Facebook apps, why the excitement?

First of all, 10% of usage on Facebook, the second biggest site in the world, is still a huge market.

And also almost certainly because those who do use apps, use them a lot. Social games are a perfect example: not everyone plays them, but those who do, play them a lot. And a smaller minority pay for virtual goods in those games, but that minority pays enough to fund a thriving social games industry.

It’s definitely possible to build big businesses on the Facebook platform. But those numbers are a useful reality check: Facebook isn’t becoming a new internet, with Facebook apps replacing websites, as some fear. People still overwhelmingly use Facebook for what it’s designed for: knowing what our friends are up to.

chart of the day, time spent on facebook, may 2011

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Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/chart-of-the-day-ipad-traffic-2011-6

It’s been more than a year since Apple’s iPad started shipping, and around the world, it’s still overwhelmingly the only tablet that matters.

ComScore just released a bunch of stats about traffic consumption on non-PC devices in 13 countries, including tablets, smartphones, and other devices, such as the iPod touch.

We analyzed comScore’s data to focus just on tablet usage, and charted the iPad’s traffic share in each country. It was 95% or higher in 12 of the 13 countries, with Android the second-place finisher in most countries (and “other” in Canada, home of RIM).

Of note: China isn’t one of the countries reported by comScore in this data. That could be a market where Android does particularly well. We’ll see. And, of course, plenty more competition is on the way from the likes of HP, Microsoft, etc. But for now, the iPad stands alone.

iPad traffic by country, comScore

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Source: http://www.emarketer.com/(X(1)S(1gotvubn20o2jfmkm4fab3v1))/Report.aspx?code=emarketer_2000780&AspxAutoDetectCookieSupport=1

US Twitter use will continue to grow through 2013, although usage levels and growth rates will be modest compared with earlier forecasts. Still, Twitter will remain a strong force within the social media ecosystem and a viable venue for marketers targeting youthful, engaged audiences.

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