Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/wireless-subscribers-in-the-united-states-2011-10


smartphone texting and emailing

CTIA released a new survey yesterday with some interesting data on wireless subscribers in the U.S. The survey covers January 2011 through June 2011.

Right now there are more than 327 million wireless subscriptions in the U.S. That’s about 20 million more subscriptions than there are people.

How is that possible?

The survey takes into account all wireless subscriptions, including tablets. Apparently, many people are carrying around more than one connected device.

Some other interesting stats from the survey:

  • The average local monthly wireless bill is $47.23.
  • 1.138 trillion text messages received.
  • 278.3 million active data-capable devices running. (That includes tablets, wireless hotspots, etc.)

Read more survey results from CTIA here >

 

 

 

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Source: http://www.marketingcharts.com/direct/smbs-plan-tablet-adoption-19275/

Although only 43% of small-to-mid-sized businesses (SMBs) currently use tablets, this figure will rise 77% to 76% in 18 months, according to [pdf] a September 2011 survey from Fonality and Webtorials. Results of “The Nature of Mobility in SMB Workforces” indicate the only other mobile device which will see growth among SMB users are specialty/custom-built [...]


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Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/chart-of-the-day-the-iphone-5s-unprecedented-demand-2011-9

Apple’s reported decision to release a new iPhone in the fall, as opposed to the summer, will deliver massive sales, writes RBC analyst Mike Abramsky in a note.

RBC surveyed 2,200 consumers and found “unprecedented demand,” with 31% of consumers very/somewhat likely to buy an iPhone 5, which is stronger than the 25% of consumers that were very/somewhat likely to buy an iPhone 4, when RBC did the same sort of survey before it launched.

Further, Abramsky says that Apple’s delay could cause a bigger upgrade from existing iPhone owners, since the iPhone 4 is 15 months old. He says 66% of existing iPhone owners are very/somewhat likely to buy a new iPhone.

He’s bumping his estimates for Apple’s 2012 fiscal year as a result. He thinks the company sells 110 million iPhones, generates $140 billion in sales overall, and earns $34.50 per share for fiscal 2012. 

chart of the day rbc iphone 5 demand

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Source: http://blog.compete.com/2011/07/15/scion-seeks-soul-and-souls/

The Scion brand was among the first “alternative” automotive youth brands in the US.   Highest-ever monthly sales were 19,252 units in August 2006, but Scion may have lost its soul since.  In 2010 (before any earthquake-related shortages), sales averaged 3,800 units a month.  Compete assessed key drivers of Scion sales (shoppers and conversion) to help reveal the drivers of Scion’s off-pace results, and fielded a survey on consumer perceptions of Scion.

Missing the Shopper Recovery

The number of unique Scion shoppers at the brand level has trended down over the past 30 months.  (Unique means shoppers of more than one Scion model are counted only once at the brand level).  Fewer shoppers in 2009 could be related to the recession, which impacted everyone.  Through the first half of 2009, Scion’s Share of Market Interest (SMI) was fairly steady, meaning its shopper volumes tracked with the market.  But as market shopper volume has recovered since then, Scion’s has not: its SMI was near a period low in June 2011.  Keep in mind that vehicle shortages impact sales, not shopping.

Scion More Quirky than Youthful?

To shed light on possible reasons for Scion’s SMI decline, Compete fielded a digital general population survey in June on consumer perceptions of the brand.  Over 60% felt they did not know enough about Scion to have an opinion.  Of the 39% that offered an opinion, “quirky” and “economical” led results.  In a recession, “economical” would seem to help shopping and sales; perhaps “quirky” is overpowering “economical.” “Youthful” was a distant third, potentially leaving Scion with a market hinging on quirky but economical products not quite geared toward younger buyers.

Scion Soul in Context

Kia’s Soul was one of the models that followed in Scion’s footsteps.   It has distinctive styling in the boxy genre and a low base price, and its advertising has argualbly been youth-oriented.  For context, Compete compared shopper volume for Soul against Scion overall.  The volumes are surprisingly similar (meaning that Soul alone has about the same number of shoppers as Scion overall).   The strength of Soul may mean that some would-be Scion shoppers instead shopped Soul, or may have shopped Soul in addition to Scion.

Showdown in the Showroom

Despite similar shopper volumes, Soul monthly sales have averaged 37% higher than Scion’s, and have exceed 10,000 units in each of the past four months; Scion averaged 4,850 in the same period.   So while Scion and Soul each had the same potential for sales, Kia has been more effective at converting Soul shoppers into Soul buyers.  Soul conversion has better Scion’s in all months but one since February 2010.

Scion Redemption

The good news is that Scion today has the potential to sell more vehicles, based on current shopper volumes (or souls).  The bad news is that it has lost shoppers over time in absolute terms and relative to the market, and its ability to convert shoppers into buyers trails potential rivals, like Soul.

Of course there’s more to the story.  Logical next steps Scion can investigate to restore sales include the following.  These same steps can be used by others looking to launch Scion-compatible products to better understand Scion’s trajectory to date:

  • Understand why the market’s shopper growth is not reaching Scion
    • Ad effectiveness: Compare SMI to share of voice: coincident drops in both may simply mean Scion was outspent.
    • Avoiders: Field a shopper avoider study to in-market consumers of Scion rivals that are not shopping Scion and ask why (lack of awareness, lack of familiarity, etc.).
    • Spillover demand: Quantify reverse-cross-shop trends to reveal which rivals’ shoppers are cross-shopping Scion and which are not and how that has changed over time.
  • Understand Scion conversion inhibitors
    • Benchmarking: Compare Scion conversion trends by model against target rivals.
    • Influences: Evaluate conversion relative to core conversion influencers, such as inventory levels, incentives, and other conversion influencers.
    • Rival refinement: Evaluate Scion cross-shop data to help reveal the extent to which Scion’s actual rivals are not target rivals, and the extent to which conversion by target or true rivals is impacting Scion conversion.

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Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/chart-of-the-day-rim-htc-2011-6

When Steve Jobs unveiled the iPhone on Jan. 9, 2007, the mobile industry changed forever. All of a sudden, software and user interfaces mattered on mobile devices. It was a turning point for many companies.

Some, like Palm and Motorola, started to crash almost immediately. Others, like Nokia, took longer.

Research In Motion, which makes BlackBerry devices, actually did very well for a long time, capturing a lot of the market with email- and messaging-focused phones, strong carrier promotion, and a solid corporate base.

But RIM has suffered recently as it has been unable to compete with Apple and Google Android in the lucrative high end of the smartphone market. Its growth has been coming from selling cheaper phones overseas, and U.S. carriers aren’t promoting RIM devices like they used to.

Meanwhile, Taiwan-based HTC has been one of the more exciting stories in the industry. It made an early bet on Google Android and has been riding it to success. Earlier this year, HTC passed RIM in market cap. (Data courtesy Capital IQ.)

Continued success isn’t guaranteed for HTC, of course. Samsung has been rising fast in the Android market, and HTC still hasn’t shown it’s going to be a threat in the tablet business.

But it seems to be in much better shape than RIM, which is struggling to stay relevant in the early stages of a big, risky platform change — as it moves away from the old BlackBerry software to a new OS called QNX.

RIM HTC market cap since January 2007

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Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/chart-of-the-day-social-sites-have-little-effect-on-where-you-buy-stuff-online-2011-4

While Google is “super nervous” about the growth of Facebook, here’s one data point to put the search company at ease for right now.

According to a Goldman Sachs survey, social sites have very little influence over online shopping decisions. Search engines, and recommendation engines have a much greater influence.

As long as Google has influence over shopping habits, it will continue to pull in big ad dollars. Advertisers tend to want to advertise where there’s a chance a purchasing decision can be influenced.

However, in the not too distant future Facebook could become an e-commerce juggernaut with more influence over online shopping. If and when that happens, Google should be really worried.

chart of the day, search engines shopping, march 2011

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UPDATE: Nearly two in five CMOs say their biggest challenge is “integrating and tracking multiple channels,” according to a recent survey by Aprimo and Argyle Executive Forum. In light of that finding, I thought I’d reprise a column that I wrote last year and use it to discuss correlating relative ROI (define) across channels like TV, print, radio, and online banner ads.

Lift in search volume for particular terms – like non-generic brand names – is useful because it indicates that the target customers not only saw the ads, but also remembered them and then took action. It is a better metric than those that only estimate whether ads were even seen or heard – i.e., reach and frequency-based metrics. This even works well for online banner or branding campaigns because it is not the click-through from those ads that we are concerned with, it is the lift in search volume that indicates interest and intent. The habit of search by modern users is now commonplace; as they all go online to look for additional information before making a purchase decision, we now have a universally applicable metric to correlate the effectiveness (and thus the relative ROI) of advertising across channels.

What about absolute ROI? We’ve got that covered too. Beyond lift in search volume, with proper analytics on online destinations, advertisers can track where customers came from, calculate how many took desirable actions like completing a purchase or printing a coupon (for items purchased offline). With these metrics, advertisers can correlate with other known data such as conversion rates of coupons, etc., to derive real-world ROI, scientifically. Obviously there are nuances and caveats, but if applied carefully these methods can help CMOs overcome what keeps them up at night.

Read More:  How to Use Search to Calculate the ROI of Awareness Advertising

Erik_SontumClickZ: How to Use Search to Calculate the ROI of Awareness Advertising. http://bit.ly/ardDy5 via @tomtsinas #merkevare

acfou@clickZ How to calculate relative ROI across channels using lift in search volume #ROI #IntegratedMarketing - http://bit.ly/g5FUu

Carroll_PowellRT @eMarketer: How to Use Search to Calculate the ROI of Awareness Advertising - http://bit.ly/99y2HG RT @acfou

hilloupayjouRT @travelwithdayo: Solid article on how to use Search to Calculate Ad Awareness ROI: http://bit.ly/aHqGQV #SEO #Advertising

iamgfcRT @clickz How to Use Search to Calculate the #ROI of Awareness Advertising – ClickZ http://bit.ly/7zp3FE

jumpcurveRT @eMarketer: How to Use Search to Calculate the ROI of Awareness Advertising - http://bit.ly/99y2HG RT @acfou

SthdesignRT @eMarketer: How to Use Search to Calculate the ROI of Awareness Advertising - http://bit.ly/99y2HG RT

lawton_chilesRT @TomPick: RT @clickz How to Use Search to Calculate the ROI of Awareness Advertising – ClickZ http://bit.ly/7zp3FE

RobHerremaRT @clickz How to Use Search to Calculate the ROI of Awareness Advertising – ClickZ http://bit.ly/7zp3FE

chead95Good article, but Search misses other brand relationships – RT @clickz Using Search to Calculate ROI of Awareness Ads-http://bit.ly/7zp3FE

doughayRT @clickz How to Use Search to Calculate the ROI of Awareness Advertising – ClickZ http://bit.ly/7zp3FE

mobiaconRT @eMarketer: “How to Use Search to Calculate the ROI of Awareness Advertising - http://bit.ly/99y2HG RT @acfou

ADMAFORUMRT @dpletikosa: How to Use Search to Calculate the ROI of Awareness Advertising http://www.clickz.com/3633054

dpletikosaHow to Use Search to Calculate the ROI of Awareness Advertising http://www.clickz.com/3633054

KristenShueRT @TomPick: RT @clickz How to Use Search to Calculate the ROI of Awareness Advertising – ClickZ http://bit.ly/7zp3FE

TomPickRT @clickz How to Use Search to Calculate the ROI of Awareness Advertising – ClickZ http://bit.ly/7zp3FE

joskouiHow to Use Search to Calculate the ROI of Awareness Advertising. #Search, #ROI, #Marketing, #Advertising http://bit.ly/7zp3FE

followtorontoRT @tomtsinas: How to Use Search to Calculate the ROI of Awareness Advertising | http://bit.ly/ardDy5

vidaimaginariaHow to Use Search to Calculate the ROI of Awareness Advertising - http://bit.ly/99y2HG RT @acfou @eMarketer

conversionationHow to Use Search to Calculate the ROI of Awareness Advertising – ClickZ http://ow.ly/1QSFR – very interesting for the integrated thinkers

micheleguidoRT @eMarketer: How to Use Search to Calculate the ROI of Awareness Advertising - http://bit.ly/99y2HG RT @acfou

ChrissyZhouLeverage search marketing to boost up your bottom line http://www.clickz.com/3633054

AdvertisingPRCalculate the #ROI of Awareness #Advertising through #Search http://bit.ly/99y2HG

pweiderholmRT @eMarketer: How to Use Search to Calculate the ROI of Awareness Advertising - http://bit.ly/99y2HG RT @acfou

oleagaRT @eMarketer: How to Use Search to Calculate the ROI of Awareness Advertising - http://bit.ly/99y2HG RT @acfou

travelwithdayoSolid article on how to use Search to Calculate Ad Awareness ROI: http://bit.ly/aHqGQV #SEO #Advertising

kingstonjrGreat article. RT @clickz How to Use Search to Calculate the ROI of Awareness Advertising – ClickZ http://bit.ly/7zp3FE

telerobRT @digeratti: RT @eMarketer: How to Use Search to Calculate the ROI of Awareness Advertising - http://bit.ly/99y2HG RT @acfou

digerattiRT @eMarketer: How to Use Search to Calculate the ROI of Awareness Advertising - http://bit.ly/99y2HG RT @acfou

tomtsinasHow to Use Search to Calculate the ROI of Awareness Advertising | http://bit.ly/ardDy5

AgeSluisRT @eMarketer: How to Use Search to Calculate the ROI of Awareness Advertising - http://bit.ly/99y2HG RT @acfou

Slingshot_SEORT @eMarketer How to Use Search to Calculate the ROI of Awareness Advertising - http://bit.ly/99y2HG RT @acfou

gailtwistRT @eMarketer: How to Use Search to Calculate the ROI of Awareness Advertising - http://bit.ly/99y2HG RT @acfou

pathamilton3How to Use Search to Calculate the ROI of Awareness Advertising - http://bit.ly/99y2HG

iancsouzaUsando mecanismos de buscas para ajudar no cálculo de ROI de publicidade tradicional. Útil! http://bit.ly/99y2HG (via @eMarketer e @acfou )

micklalalaHow to Use Search to Calculate the ROI of Awareness Advertising - http://bit.ly/99y2HG RT @acfou via @eMarketer

cxdigitalRT @eMarketer: How to Use Search to Calculate the ROI of Awareness Advertising - http://bit.ly/99y2HG RT @acfou

IdeaViewsRT @eMarketer: How to Use Search to Calculate the ROI of Awareness Advertising - http://bit.ly/99y2HG RT @acfou

NASinsightsHow to Use Search to Calculate the ROI of Awareness Advertising - http://bit.ly/99y2HG RT @acfou

Lisa_CorcoranRT @eMarketer How to Use Search to Calculate the ROI of Awareness Advertising - http://bit.ly/99y2HG RT @acfou

RobertoCarrerasRT @eMarketer: How to Use Search to Calculate the ROI of Awareness Advertising - http://bit.ly/99y2HG RT @acfou

eMarketerHow to Use Search to Calculate the ROI of Awareness Advertising - http://bit.ly/99y2HG RT @acfou

jrmostellerRT @clickz How to Use Search to Calculate the ROI of Awareness Advertising – ClickZ http://bit.ly/7zp3FE

acfouCMOs bemoan inability to track ROI across channels - http://bit.ly/bAM4gu; lift in search volume can solve that - http://bit.ly/g5FUu

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Source: http://www.marketingcharts.com/topics/behavioral-marketing/celeb-product-hawkers-fail-to-sway-consumers-10042/?utm_campaign=rssfeed&utm_source=mc&utm_medium=textlink

Though the media feeds consumers a constant stream of minutiae about celebrities’ private lives, and celebs who Tweet seem to have legions of avid followers, a new study of LinkedIn http://www.linkedin.com/users by AdWeekMedia http://www.adweek.com/ finds that most US consumers say they are not at all swayed by celebrity endorsements of products.

When respondents in the survey were asked whether the presence of a celebrity in an ad makes them more likely, less likely or neither more or less likely to buy the product, nearly 8 in 10 (78%) said it doesn’t sway them one way or the other. In fact, only 8% said the presence of a celebrity spokesperson makes them more likely to buy a product. This compares with a significant 12% who actually say it makes them less likely to buy a product.

[image: adweek-linkedin-poll-overall-results-celebrity-ad-favorability-august-2009.jpg]

Additional findings by demographic group:

- Older respondents are especially likely to reject celebrities as spokespeople. Nearly one-quarter (24%) of those ages 55+ say seeing a celeb in an ad makes them less likely to buy a product, vs. just 4% saying it makes them more likely to buy. – Men (15%) are slightly more likely than women (11) to say a celeb deters them from buying a product. – 20% of business owners vs. 11% of people with jobs in the “management” category say the presence celebrities in ads make them less likely to buy.

[image: adweek-linkedin-poll-results-job-titles-favorability-celebrities-august-2009.jpg]

– while 19% of survey participants in “creative” roles said a celeb in an ad makes them less likely to buy. This compares with 8% saying it makes them more likely.

A recent survey by Harris Interactive found that Americans do not consider the occupations of actor, entertainer and athlete to have a great deal of prestige.

*About the survey:* The survey was conducted online in July among a sample of 4,778 LinkedIn users.

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