Source: http://www.engadget.com/2011/10/25/netbooks-slip-under-tablet-shipments-achieve-has-beeen-status/

Still unconvinced we’re headed towards a post-PC future? We can at least conclusively say we’ve entered a post-netbook present, as Q2 2011 marks the first time their numbers have been eclipsed by tablets, according to ABI Research. 13.6 million slates were shipped in the quarter, besting the 7.3 million the diminutive laptops were able to clock in When compared to the prior quarter, that works out to 112 percent or 7.2 million increase (!) for the former, and a 1.1 million decline for the latter. Cost apparently isn’t a driving factor, as the firm notes that tablets pack an average price of $600 — nearly double that of their trackpad-toting brethren. Oh, and in case you were wondering, 68 percent of tablets shipped were of Cupertino’s flavor. More cold hard facts await you in the PR after the break.

Continue reading Netbooks slip under tablet shipments, achieve has-bEeen status

Netbooks slip under tablet shipments, achieve has-bEeen status originally appeared on Engadget on Tue, 25 Oct 2011 02:34:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/chart-of-the-day-netflix-subscribers-2011-9

Netflix has more subscribers than any single cable company, a number that is up 10 million from last year. That’s impressive.

But perhaps not as impressive as the 80 million the major cable companies boast as a collective. That figure could explain why Starz walked away.

“For now, they may be in a better position to make Starz money than Netflix is — even if Netflix reportedly offered more than $300 million per year for Starz content,” Dan Frommer writes.

In the coming months, we will see if Starz made the right call.

chart of the day, video subscribers, sep 2011

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Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/chart-of-the-day-iphone-4-cost-breakdown-2011-8

Here’s an interesting look at what’s inside the iPhone and how much it costs from The Economist.

As you’ll notice, Samsung provides 26% of the parts for the phone. Apple is currently suing Samsung and accusing it of ripping off the look and feel of Apple products. Granted, they’re separate divisions at Samsung, but it has to make the relationship between the two companies awkward.

Another thing to note in this breakdown: It costs Apple just $178 in components for a phone that sells at an average price of $560.

chart of the day, iphone 4 cost breakdown, aug 2011

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Source: http://blog.compete.com/2011/07/15/scion-seeks-soul-and-souls/

The Scion brand was among the first “alternative” automotive youth brands in the US.   Highest-ever monthly sales were 19,252 units in August 2006, but Scion may have lost its soul since.  In 2010 (before any earthquake-related shortages), sales averaged 3,800 units a month.  Compete assessed key drivers of Scion sales (shoppers and conversion) to help reveal the drivers of Scion’s off-pace results, and fielded a survey on consumer perceptions of Scion.

Missing the Shopper Recovery

The number of unique Scion shoppers at the brand level has trended down over the past 30 months.  (Unique means shoppers of more than one Scion model are counted only once at the brand level).  Fewer shoppers in 2009 could be related to the recession, which impacted everyone.  Through the first half of 2009, Scion’s Share of Market Interest (SMI) was fairly steady, meaning its shopper volumes tracked with the market.  But as market shopper volume has recovered since then, Scion’s has not: its SMI was near a period low in June 2011.  Keep in mind that vehicle shortages impact sales, not shopping.

Scion More Quirky than Youthful?

To shed light on possible reasons for Scion’s SMI decline, Compete fielded a digital general population survey in June on consumer perceptions of the brand.  Over 60% felt they did not know enough about Scion to have an opinion.  Of the 39% that offered an opinion, “quirky” and “economical” led results.  In a recession, “economical” would seem to help shopping and sales; perhaps “quirky” is overpowering “economical.” “Youthful” was a distant third, potentially leaving Scion with a market hinging on quirky but economical products not quite geared toward younger buyers.

Scion Soul in Context

Kia’s Soul was one of the models that followed in Scion’s footsteps.   It has distinctive styling in the boxy genre and a low base price, and its advertising has argualbly been youth-oriented.  For context, Compete compared shopper volume for Soul against Scion overall.  The volumes are surprisingly similar (meaning that Soul alone has about the same number of shoppers as Scion overall).   The strength of Soul may mean that some would-be Scion shoppers instead shopped Soul, or may have shopped Soul in addition to Scion.

Showdown in the Showroom

Despite similar shopper volumes, Soul monthly sales have averaged 37% higher than Scion’s, and have exceed 10,000 units in each of the past four months; Scion averaged 4,850 in the same period.   So while Scion and Soul each had the same potential for sales, Kia has been more effective at converting Soul shoppers into Soul buyers.  Soul conversion has better Scion’s in all months but one since February 2010.

Scion Redemption

The good news is that Scion today has the potential to sell more vehicles, based on current shopper volumes (or souls).  The bad news is that it has lost shoppers over time in absolute terms and relative to the market, and its ability to convert shoppers into buyers trails potential rivals, like Soul.

Of course there’s more to the story.  Logical next steps Scion can investigate to restore sales include the following.  These same steps can be used by others looking to launch Scion-compatible products to better understand Scion’s trajectory to date:

  • Understand why the market’s shopper growth is not reaching Scion
    • Ad effectiveness: Compare SMI to share of voice: coincident drops in both may simply mean Scion was outspent.
    • Avoiders: Field a shopper avoider study to in-market consumers of Scion rivals that are not shopping Scion and ask why (lack of awareness, lack of familiarity, etc.).
    • Spillover demand: Quantify reverse-cross-shop trends to reveal which rivals’ shoppers are cross-shopping Scion and which are not and how that has changed over time.
  • Understand Scion conversion inhibitors
    • Benchmarking: Compare Scion conversion trends by model against target rivals.
    • Influences: Evaluate conversion relative to core conversion influencers, such as inventory levels, incentives, and other conversion influencers.
    • Rival refinement: Evaluate Scion cross-shop data to help reveal the extent to which Scion’s actual rivals are not target rivals, and the extent to which conversion by target or true rivals is impacting Scion conversion.

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Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/chart-of-the-day-cost-of-an-app-2011-7

Last week Apple announced that its 200 million iOS users have downloaded 15 billion applications.

How much money money is Apple making from those 15 billion downloads? Apple wasn’t so forthcoming about that, so we’ll have to rely on this estimate from Piper Jaffray analyst Gene Munster.

Munster says the average selling price of an app in the App Store is $1.44. Of that Apple nets $0.18 after you account for credit card fees and storage/delivery costs.

Since the App Store launched, Apple has earned a net profit of $538 million on paid app sales, estimates Munster. It has spent an additional $246 million on storing and delivering free apps, says Munster, suggesting Apple’s true profit is just $292 million.

Of course, that’s the narrow way of looking how much Apple is making from the App Store. Apple’s vibrant app ecosystem has helped it sell millions of iPhones, iPads, and iPod Touches, helping it earn billions in profits.

chart of the day, cost of an app, july 2011

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Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/chart-of-the-day-startup-founders-age-repeat-founders-2011-5

Who is going to be a successful entrepreneur?

Prolific early stage investor Ron Conway’s firm SV Angel gathered responses from 300 founders to try to answer that question. It’s not an exact science, but it seems young co-founders doing their second startup tend to produce better results than older sole founders on their first company.

Or as Michael Arrington put it today, “Old people suck at startups.”

Why is it that younger people have a tendency to succeed? Conway speculated that older founders are more cautious and will take earlier, cheaper exits for security, whereas a younger founder will let their company brew for a while, gaining value.

chart of the day, myths about founders, may 2011

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Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/chart-of-the-day-startup-founders-age-repeat-founders-2011-5

Who is going to be a successful entrepreneur?

Prolific early stage investor Ron Conway’s firm SV Angel gathered responses from 300 founders to try to answer that question. It’s not an exact science, but it seems young co-founders doing their second startup tend to produce better results than older sole founders on their first company.

Or as Michael Arrington put it today, “Old people suck at startups.”

Why is it that younger people have a tendency to succeed? Conway speculated that older founders are more cautious and will take earlier, cheaper exits for security, whereas a younger founder will let their company brew for a while, gaining value.

chart of the day, myths about founders, may 2011

Follow the Chart Of The Day on Twitter: @chartoftheday

For the latest tech news, visit SAI: Silicon Alley Insider. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook.

Join the conversation about this story »

See Also:

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Source: http://techcrunch.com/2011/03/29/angelpad-round-two/

Last August, we broke the news that a new startup incubator was about to launch that was run by seven ex-Googlers, AngelPad. By November, the initial class of eight startups were ready to launch. Today, barely four months later, class number two is ready to be unveiled. And this time there are thirteen of them. At this rate, to quote the best line in Jaws, they’re “gonna need a bigger boat”.

The fact that the class was whittled down to even thirteen is impressive, as the AngelPad team had several hundred applications to go through this time, co-founder Thomas Korte tells us. And while many in the initial class also featured fellow ex-Googlers, this group is more diversified (though the Google blood still runs deep with a number of them).

Below, find a brief description of the 13:

Shopobot

Shopobot is all about leveraging your social graph to make better purchasing decisions. Say you want to buy a camera, but want advice you know will be unbiased, the best way is to ask your friends. Shopobot allows you to easily find that information on their site, alongside a timeline of a product’s price on Amazon (these are much more volatile than you may think). They’re also focusing on creating useful widgets for other sites that get around the “banner blindness” issue which most shopping widgets lead to.

Astrid

Astrid makes mobile applications that allow you to easily share and collaborate on tasks. This is ideal for groups because everyone in the group can be assigned something to do, and make it known once it’s done. And unlike some other collaboration software, the interface is super simple. From a broader perspective, the idea is to inspire others to join you in doing certain things — ideas you get from reading a book or a blog post. They have a button to make this all easily shareable. The team already has 1.7 million downloads on Android and now they’re coming to iOS.

Hopscotch

Hopscotch is a service built around the idea of extending the current abilities of QR codes. Right now, you scan a code and you’re often just taken to a website about a product. These guys want to create a web browser for the real world, meaning that all physical objects can have elements that show up when scanned. If you scan a QR code on a concert poster, your social graph should know that you’re into that band, and maybe one of your friends would like to go to that show with you. While the core idea is based around QR codes right now (both existing ones and new ones that they’ll help others create), eventually the plan is to get into NFC or image recognition as those technologies mature.

Cloudbot

Cloudbot calls themselves the “cloud command line”. What that means is that their aim is to be one app (both mobile and web) that allows you to easily interact with many other apps and services. You might enter in “call XXXXX” and you’ll it will call the friend’s name you entered. Or you might enter “gram XXXXX” and it will show you the Instagram photos from that person. And it uses real world data. If you type “eat with XXXXX”, the app will look at your location and the location of the friend you entered and find a good place near both of you. Currently, they have 24 integration points with various apps/services and more are coming.

Kismet

Kismet is a mobile dating site focused on real identity and real photos. The founders note that most dating sites are a sea of faces, but most are false advertising. And many mobile dating experiences right now skew towards the sleazy side of things. Kismet aims to be a more natural dating app with women in particular in mind. They look at locations you actually go to and pictures you actually take on other social networks to provide a real profile for yourself (naturally tide into your real Facebook identity as well). The idea is that where you spend a lot of your time and what you do already says a lot about you, Kismet just surfaces it for potential dates to see.

Splash

Splash is a new social plug-in for mobile games (first for the iPhone, then for Android). It’s essentially a social platform that developers can have include in their gaming apps as an always one-touch-away overlay. When touched, it shows you your friends also playing games online and allows you to interact with them. You can also send gifts (virtual goods) this way, get notifications, and make announcements. On the developer side of things, there is a dashboard to help you keep track of all of the data flowing in. Unlike Apple’s Game Center and OpenFeint which focus on leaderboards, they focus on the social layer in realtime.

Crittercism

Crittercism provides a way for developers to monitor bugs and crashes in their mobile apps. If you read over reviews in the App Store, you’ll see that many are actually bug reports — Crittercism has a way to hopefully stop that from happening as they monitor issues in realtime and provide a simple way for a user to provide feedback through their own channel. The service gets baked into the app by the developer before launch and resides in a place that a user can access and share issues (either anonymously or with a Crittercism profile). And problems are automatically tracked and emailed back to developers. The platform is already up and running on five hit apps and while it seems like something that Apple or Google could eventually offer, Crittercism’s view is a cross-platform one that very easy for developers to work with.

Stickery

Stickery makes learning-based games for kids. But while that’s already a crowded market, their twist is that there games are actually data-driven. As in, after kids play the games, reports are sent back to parents to let them know what areas the children need help with and what they excel in. “We are focused on the post-game highlights,” is how they put it. And while this seems like it could be a platform play, the team is also committed to making their own fun games. Right now they have one with seven more planned.

LocBox

LocBox looked at the crowded daily deal space and saw a big problem: customer retention rates. Because there are so many different deal services that people are trying out, everyone seems to be only partially committed to it. LocBox aims to simplify the experience by giving everyone an important cool to keep customers: an iPad. That is, they give merchants an iPad loaded with their CRM software to reduce the friction for trying out and sticking with their system — and also for customers using it.

CompanyLine

The easiest way to think of CompanyLine is as a sort of Facebook Groups for business. But a key part of it is the nice integration they have with other services like WebEx and Dropbox. It works so well that AngelPad themselves apparently use it now internally over the old way of doing things: Google Groups (again, these are ex-Googlers we’re talking about). The name is drawn from the idea that the way companies collaborate today is sort of like phone line switchboards in the 1950s. They want to change that.

Feedgen

Feedgen is a sales lead platform that utilizes social elements. They note the disconnect between marketing and sales — the amount of leads brought in by marketing don’t end up meaning much. But leads can come from elsewhere: enter social networks. Another key is the UI. They use the familiar inbox style to manage leads. You can think of it as a “priority inbox” for leads, they note (referencing Google’s newish system for ranking email in Gmail).

Coverhound

Coverhound is simply online insurance shopping that works. “It’s a complete scam right now,” the founders say pointing to how much of what you see online is little more than bait. And that shows on the other end as something like 300 leads are needed to sign just one new person up for a policy. Coverhound changes the dynamic by being a filter for both sides. They take customers basic information (name, address, email) and pull up information about them from third parties that is then used to serve up accurate estimates from the insurance companies. It’s sort of like Kayak for car insurance.

SecondLeap

SecondLeap is a search engine for people who want to change careers. It’s not about career advancement, it’s about people looking to make a true total change. The service show those people what the potential impact is in terms of years needed for a new career and what the financial impact will be. If it’s determined that the career change will be a good one, SecondLeap helps the user find the right school and loan to make the change happen.

Information provided by CrunchBase


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