Source: http://www.engadget.com/2011/10/06/comscore-android-extends-lead-over-apple-holds-44-percent-of-s/

Gather ’round, everyone, because a fresh batch of ComScore numbers has just arrived. According to the research firm, Android remains in firm control of the smartphone platform market, commanding 43.7 percent, followed by Apple (27.3 percent) and RIM (19.7 percent). In fact, Google extended its share by nearly two points over last month’s figures, while Apple’s iOS grew by just 0.3 points, but further distanced itself from RIM, which now sits 7.6 points behind. On the manufacturing side of the equation, Samsung remains top dog, accounting for 25.3 percent of all mobile subscribers (including both smartphone and feature phone users), followed by LG (21 percent) and Motorola (14 percent). Apple, meanwhile, sits a distant fourth, at 9.8 percent, followed by RIM, which rounds out the top five with 7.1 percent market share. Number crunchers can find more fodder in the full PR, after the break.

Continue reading ComScore: Android extends lead over Apple, holds 44 percent of smartphone market

ComScore: Android extends lead over Apple, holds 44 percent of smartphone market originally appeared on Engadget on Thu, 06 Oct 2011 07:27:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

Permalink SlashGear  |   | Email this | Comments


drag2share – drag and drop RSS news items on your email contacts to share (click SEE DEMO)

, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/chart-of-the-day-ipod-touch-apple-android-share-2011-4

Google Android has come out of nowhere in the last couple of years to kick Apple’s butt in smartphone market share

One common rebuttal among Apple fans has always been something like, “yeah, well, add the iPod touch to Apple’s iPhone numbers, and you’ll see a different story.”

It’s true. Adding the iPod touch does make Apple’s iOS shipments and market share bigger than if you ignore it, and it narrows the gap with Android.

But it made a much better argument a year ago.

In fact, because the smartphone market, Google Android, and even the iPhone are all growing much faster than Apple’s iPod touch business, adding the iPod touch to Apple’s iPhone stats actually makes iOS’s market share smaller than it was a year ago.

Specifically, while the smartphone market nearly doubled year-over-year in Q4 to about 101 million units, according to Canalys, the iPod touch only grew 27% year-over-year to about 10 million units.

Yes, the iPod touch makes Apple’s iOS relatively bigger, and is important for the iOS app platform, especially for gaming. But it doesn’t help the market share growth argument versus Android, because everything else is growing much faster than the iPod touch. (See data table below.)

This chart shows Android’s market share soaring from Q4 2009 to Q4 2010, whether the iPod touch is included in the overall market or not. Apple’s market share is significantly higher when the iPod touch is included, and the gap with Android is smaller. But the iPod touch actually hurts Apple’s market share growth year-over-year.

SAI chart Android iPhone iOS market share iPod touch

SAI data Android iPhone iOS market share iPod touch

Follow the Chart Of The Day on Twitter: @chartoftheday

Join the conversation about this story »

See Also:

, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Source: http://www.marketingcharts.com/topics/behavioral-marketing/celeb-product-hawkers-fail-to-sway-consumers-10042/?utm_campaign=rssfeed&utm_source=mc&utm_medium=textlink

Though the media feeds consumers a constant stream of minutiae about celebrities’ private lives, and celebs who Tweet seem to have legions of avid followers, a new study of LinkedIn http://www.linkedin.com/users by AdWeekMedia http://www.adweek.com/ finds that most US consumers say they are not at all swayed by celebrity endorsements of products.

When respondents in the survey were asked whether the presence of a celebrity in an ad makes them more likely, less likely or neither more or less likely to buy the product, nearly 8 in 10 (78%) said it doesn’t sway them one way or the other. In fact, only 8% said the presence of a celebrity spokesperson makes them more likely to buy a product. This compares with a significant 12% who actually say it makes them less likely to buy a product.

[image: adweek-linkedin-poll-overall-results-celebrity-ad-favorability-august-2009.jpg]

Additional findings by demographic group:

- Older respondents are especially likely to reject celebrities as spokespeople. Nearly one-quarter (24%) of those ages 55+ say seeing a celeb in an ad makes them less likely to buy a product, vs. just 4% saying it makes them more likely to buy. – Men (15%) are slightly more likely than women (11) to say a celeb deters them from buying a product. – 20% of business owners vs. 11% of people with jobs in the “management” category say the presence celebrities in ads make them less likely to buy.

[image: adweek-linkedin-poll-results-job-titles-favorability-celebrities-august-2009.jpg]

– while 19% of survey participants in “creative” roles said a celeb in an ad makes them less likely to buy. This compares with 8% saying it makes them more likely.

A recent survey by Harris Interactive found that Americans do not consider the occupations of actor, entertainer and athlete to have a great deal of prestige.

*About the survey:* The survey was conducted online in July among a sample of 4,778 LinkedIn users.

, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,