Source: http://gizmodo.com/5848961/an-important-message-from-sonys-chief-information-security-officer-oh-god-no-its-happening-again

An Important Message From Sony’s Chief Information Security Officer: "OH GOD, NO, IT'S HAPPENING AGAIN"Poor old Sony was hammered by both media and its own users earlier this year, after news broke of a large-scale hacking of its PlayStation Network. And now it’s happened again.

The latest case involves Sony detecting a mass attempt to sign in to PSN accounts with a job-lot of user names and passwords, which the company says it believes may have been obtained through a third-party rather than extracted from PSN itself. Fortunately, the “overwhelming majority” of user name and password combinations failed.

However, Sony believes approximately 93,000 accounts (33k in Europe) have been compromised, with outsiders able to correctly sign in to PlayStation Network using the stolen data. Those accounts have now been “temporarily locked” pending a new password reset and account validation scheme.

Sony says credit card data is safe, and it’ll refund anyone should they find evidence of any suspicious activity. [Sony via T3]

Image credit: NME.


An Important Message From Sony’s Chief Information Security Officer: "OH GOD, NO, IT'S HAPPENING AGAIN"Our newest offspring Gizmodo UK is gobbling up the news in a different timezone, so check them out if you need another Giz fix.


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Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/chart-of-the-day-vc-exits-2011-6

The environment for early stage startup investing is very “challenging” right now because big exits are still rare, but Series A round valuations have grown larger and larger, according to Fred Wilson, one of the best known early stage investors in the world.

On his blog, Wilson highlights the chart below which comes from Mark Suster. It shows the number of exits over $100 million on an annual basis is relatively small. There are 1,000 early stage fundings annually, according to the NVCA, which means just 5%-10% are producing big exits.

“At at time when the average Series A round is now north of $20mm (based on very anecdotal evidence and not at all scientific), this poses challenges for the VC industry,” says Wilson.

Wilson simplifies the math to prove his point, but says assume a fund can get one company to exit at a $250 million valuation. If it invested in 20 companies at an average valuation of $20 million, then it has committed $400 million.

The one big exit isn’t going to provide enough of a return to cover the portfolio, which is how the VC business has traditionally worked.

So, either the VC model needs to evolve, or valuations need to come down.

Annual exits for VC-backed startups worth more than $100 million

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Source: http://www.engadget.com/2011/05/30/arm-hopes-to-strengthen-grip-on-mobile-pcs-take-50-per-cent-of/

We’ve already heard rumors that chip designer ARM has been trying to get its wares into the Macbook Air. While we can’t add anything to that particular story, we do have further evidence that ARM is going beyond smartphones and tablets in order to target bigger form factors. The company’s president, Tudor Brown, has just appeared at Computex to declare that ARM wants to conquer the “mobile PC market”, where the company currently only has a 10 percent share. He’s aiming for 15 percent by the end of this year, and an Intel-provoking 50 percent by 2015. “Mobile PC” is a pretty ambiguous category, but we think it’s safe to assume the focus is on low- and mid-power netbooks and ultraportables. Such devices could potentially run off ARM’s forthcoming multi-core chips — like perhaps the quad-core beast inside NVIDIA’s mind-blowing Kal-El processor, or the more distant Cortex-A15. It’s hard to imagine these tablet-centric chips ever competing with Intel’s top performers, but four years is a mighty long time in this business.

ARM hopes to strengthen grip on mobile PCs, take 50 percent of the market by 2015 originally appeared on Engadget on Mon, 30 May 2011 08:57:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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