Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/chart-of-the-day-facebook-time-2011-9

Facebook’s domination of time spent on the web is absolutely astonishing.

A new report on social media from Nielsen shows U.S. users spent 53.5 billion minutes on Facebook in May, which is more time than was spent on the next four biggest sites.

(If you include YouTube with Google, then it’s more time than the next three biggest sites.)

 chart of the day, web brands, time spent may 2011, sep 2011

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Source: http://blog.compete.com/2011/06/16/may-2011-search-market-share-report/

search engines
search market share May 2011

  • Search query volume across the 5 engines picked up slightly in May (up 2.5% from April), driving small shifts in search market share.
  • Google’s share of the search market declined by 0.2ppts, although its query volume increased by 2.3%.
  • While Microsoft’s share of the search market declined by 0.1ppt, the growth of Yahoo! by 0.5ppts resulted in an increase for Bing Powered engines M-O-M.
  • Yahoo! experienced the largest growth in queries, driving a 0.5ppt M-O-M increase in share.
  • All 5 engines saw slight increases in the number of unique visitors from April to May except for AOL which remained flat.
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Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/chart-of-the-day-netflix-cable-subscribers-2011-5

Netflix now has more subscribers than any U.S. cable or satellite provider, and it’s the only one really growing.

Netflix finished Q1 with 22.80 million subscribers, just squeaking past Comcast, the biggest cable provider, which had 22.76 million subscribers. The big difference is their growth: Netflix added almost 9 million subscribers over the last year, while Comcast lost about 700,000 video subs.

This isn’t to say that the cable companies should immediately be freaking out about Netflix — it’s still more of a complementary service to cable than a replacement.

But that could change, especially as Netflix continues to grow, and can start writing bigger checks to content companies — the sorts of checks that they could only get from the Comcasts of the world just a few years ago.

Don’t miss: Our exclusive interview with Reed Hastings, Netflix CEO

SAI chart Netflix cable subscribers

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Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/chart-of-the-day-video-conversion-2011-5

While there’s not a lot to brag about for AOL, here’s one thing it has done incredibly well. It has the second most video views across the web, according to data from comScore.

Considering how small its overall audience is compared to the rest of the web, it’s an impressive feat.

In this chart we take a look at how many unique video views are garnered in relation to the amount of unique visitors to a site. As you can see AOL is getting more of its visitors to look at video than anyone other than Google, which has YouTube.

chart of the day, video conversion, march 2011

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Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/chart-of-the-day-aol-google-yahoo-facebook-market-cap-per-unique-visitor-2011-5

AOL CEO Tim Armstrong likes to remind people that AOL sites are the fifth most trafficked in the United States. Only Google, Facebook, Yahoo, and Microsoft sites beat AOL’s 118 million unique visitors in March. Google, in first, had 176 million.

Armstrong also likes to point out how AOL, with a $2 billion market cap, is entirely dwarfed by the other four companies in that group. Yahoo is worth $25 billion, Facebook, $60 billion, and Google $176 billion.

Armstrong says this demonstrates AOL’s huge opportunity. Maybe. Or maybe it demonstrates a hugely blown opportunity. Or both.

But one thing is clear: With the traffic AOL has, if Armstrong can get the monetization engine running, there’s enormous upside.

We left Microsoft off the chart below, because it’s not an online-only business.

chart of the day, aol, google, facebook, yahoo, market cap per unique visitor, my

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Every year around SXSW, there’s a surge in interest about twitter. This time around people have even gone as far as to proclaim twitter to be “the next google” or “the future of search” etc.  Bullocks!

Here’s why:

1) distant from other social networks – While we are seeing a massive surge in interest and usage of twitter, it is still a long way off from the number of users of other social networks; it will take a long time to get to critical mass; and this is a prerequisite for twitter to assail the established habit of the majority of consumers to “google it.” — Google’s already a verb. 

2) no business model – It remains to be seen whether Twitter can come up with a business model to survive for the long haul. Ads with search are proven. Ads on social networks are not. And given the 140-character limit, there’s hardly any space to add ads. 

3) lead adopters’ perspective is skewed - Twitter is still mostly lead adopters and techies so far; so the perspectives on its potential may be skewed too positively. As more mainstream users start to use it, we’re likely to see more tweets about nose picking, waking up, making coffee, being bored, etc….  This will quickly make the collective mass of content far less specialized and useful (as it is now). 

4) too few friends to matter – Most people have too few friends. Not everyone is a Scott Monty ( @scottmonty ) with nearly 15,000 followers. So while a user’s own circle of friends would be useful for real-time searches like “what restaurant should I go to right now?” the circle is too small to know everything about everything they want to search on. And even if you take it out to a few concentric circles from the original user who asked, that depends on people retweeting your question to their followers and ultimately someone notifying you when the network has arrived at an answer — not likely to happen. 

5) topics only interesting to small circle of followers – Most topics tweeted are interesting to only a very small circle of followers, most likely not even to all the followers of a particular person. A great way to see this phenomenon is with twitt(url)y. It measures twitter intensity of a particular story and lists the most tweeted and retweeted stories.  Out of the millions of users and billions of tweets, the top most tweeted stories range in the 100 – 500 tweet range and recently these included March 18 – Apple’s iPhone OS 3.0 preview event; #skittles; and the shutdown of Denver’s Rocky Mountain News.  Most other tweets are simply not important enough to enough people for them to retweet. 

6) single purpose apps or social networks go away when other sites come along with more functionality or when big players simply add their functionality to their suite of services. 

twitter

twitturly

Am I missing something here, people?  Agree with me or tell me I’m stupid @acfou   :-)

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