Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/wireless-subscribers-in-the-united-states-2011-10


smartphone texting and emailing

CTIA released a new survey yesterday with some interesting data on wireless subscribers in the U.S. The survey covers January 2011 through June 2011.

Right now there are more than 327 million wireless subscriptions in the U.S. That’s about 20 million more subscriptions than there are people.

How is that possible?

The survey takes into account all wireless subscriptions, including tablets. Apparently, many people are carrying around more than one connected device.

Some other interesting stats from the survey:

  • The average local monthly wireless bill is $47.23.
  • 1.138 trillion text messages received.
  • 278.3 million active data-capable devices running. (That includes tablets, wireless hotspots, etc.)

Read more survey results from CTIA here >

 

 

 

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Source: http://www.engadget.com/2011/09/18/atandt-flips-lte-live-nearly-97-percent-of-america-wonders-where/

According to Ma Bell, AT&T covers 97 percent of all Americans. Of course, that’s including those “one bar of EDGE” places that are uncovered so far as reality’s concerned, but regardless of all that — there’s no denying that AT&T’s LTE launch is on the subdued side. With Verizon rolling out five times more LTE markets this month than AT&T is even launching with, the country’s largest GSM carrier definitely has some catching up to do. Regardless of the standings, the company appears to have (quietly) gone live with five LTE markets as of today, with Chicago, Atlanta, San Antonio, Dallas / Fort Worth and Houston getting first dibs. The source link below takes you to the new coverage map, as well as to a promise from the carrier to expand “4G LTE” (not to be confused with the other 4G, more accurately known as HSPA+) to 15 major metropolitan areas by the year’s end. Notice how rural areas aren’t mentioned, despite plenty of grandstanding near D.C.? Don’t worry, guys — it’s just Rethinking Possible.

[Thanks, Marcus]

AT&T flips 4G LTE live, nearly 97 percent of America wonders where the party is originally appeared on Engadget on Sun, 18 Sep 2011 12:29:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Source: http://www.engadget.com/2011/06/27/verizon-dominates-fastest-mobile-networks-testing-considers-c/

Not all wireless carriers are created equal, nor for that matter is all 4G — anyone who’s ever swapped networks or done any sort of traveling across the country can tell you that. And while it seems like we have fewer and fewer choices as the days go by, our increasing reliance on mobile devices makes the efficiency of our data delivery all the more important. PCMag invested some serious man / woman-hours for its annual “Fastest Mobile Networks” story, gathering mobile data in 21 cities — running more than 140,000 tests in all. According to the results, Verizon’s LTE rules supreme in pretty much every area tested, save for those “in-between” rural locations, where AT&T nabbed the top spot. Perhaps it’s time to take old “Test Man” out of retirement for celebratory victory lap?

Verizon dominates ‘Fastest Mobile Networks’ testing, considers calling AT&T to brag originally appeared on Engadget on Mon, 27 Jun 2011 20:18:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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Source: http://www.engadget.com/2011/06/01/microsoft-turns-to-crowdsourcing-service-to-swat-away-patent-tro/

We’ve seen the havoc that patent trolls can wreak on tech companies and Microsoft clearly wants no part of it. That’s why Ballmer & Co. have joined forces with Article One Partners — a New York-based research firm that crowdsources scientific expertise to figure out whether or not patented ideas or inventions are as innovative as they claim, based on prior art. By subscribing to Article One’s new Litigation Avoidance service, Redmond hopes “to reduce risk and reduce potential litigation cost” brought by nonpracticing entities (NPEs) — companies that collect thousands of patents, in the hopes that one may lay a golden egg. No word on how much the service will actually cost, but we’re guessing it’ll be worth at least a few legal headaches. Full presser after the break.

Continue reading Microsoft turns to crowdsourcing service to swat away patent trolls

Microsoft turns to crowdsourcing service to swat away patent trolls originally appeared on Engadget on Wed, 01 Jun 2011 05:54:00 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.

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source: http://www.mediapost.com/publications/?fa=Articles.showArticle&art_aid=109382

Non GMO ProjectWhole Foods Market has committed its private-label products to the Non-GMO Project’s third-party system for verifying that food does not contain genetically modified organisms (GMO).

The Non-GMO Project is a nonprofit collaboration of North American organic and natural product manufacturers, retailers, processors, distributors, farmers and seed breeders, plus consumers. Its stated missions are to enable consumers to make informed choices and help ensure the sustained availability of non-GMO food options.

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