Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/wireless-subscribers-in-the-united-states-2011-10


smartphone texting and emailing

CTIA released a new survey yesterday with some interesting data on wireless subscribers in the U.S. The survey covers January 2011 through June 2011.

Right now there are more than 327 million wireless subscriptions in the U.S. That’s about 20 million more subscriptions than there are people.

How is that possible?

The survey takes into account all wireless subscriptions, including tablets. Apparently, many people are carrying around more than one connected device.

Some other interesting stats from the survey:

  • The average local monthly wireless bill is $47.23.
  • 1.138 trillion text messages received.
  • 278.3 million active data-capable devices running. (That includes tablets, wireless hotspots, etc.)

Read more survey results from CTIA here >

 

 

 

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Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/chart-of-the-day-vc-exits-2011-6

The environment for early stage startup investing is very “challenging” right now because big exits are still rare, but Series A round valuations have grown larger and larger, according to Fred Wilson, one of the best known early stage investors in the world.

On his blog, Wilson highlights the chart below which comes from Mark Suster. It shows the number of exits over $100 million on an annual basis is relatively small. There are 1,000 early stage fundings annually, according to the NVCA, which means just 5%-10% are producing big exits.

“At at time when the average Series A round is now north of $20mm (based on very anecdotal evidence and not at all scientific), this poses challenges for the VC industry,” says Wilson.

Wilson simplifies the math to prove his point, but says assume a fund can get one company to exit at a $250 million valuation. If it invested in 20 companies at an average valuation of $20 million, then it has committed $400 million.

The one big exit isn’t going to provide enough of a return to cover the portfolio, which is how the VC business has traditionally worked.

So, either the VC model needs to evolve, or valuations need to come down.

Annual exits for VC-backed startups worth more than $100 million

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http://e.ccialerts.com/a/hBKWx56AHJQfmAUDSLFASbv4ulI/clck15

General Mills No Longer Needs Huge Budgets to Talk to Specific Segments

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CHICAGO (AdAge.com) — The package-goods model has always been a no-brainer: Create a mass-appeal product; distribute it nationally; stoke demand with big-budget, shotgun-style advertising to spray the widest possible market; and hope sales hit the magical $100 million first-year benchmark. But that traditional model is evolving at major marketers such as General Mills.

FULL ARTICLE http://e.ccialerts.com/a/hBKWx56AHJQfmAUDSLFASbv4ulI/clck15

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